Home      Arts & Literature      College University      Financial Aid      Future Concepts      Languages      Online Education      Psychology      Science
Introduction to Art Restoration
The nature of art is such that it tends to be fragile, particularly if it is an older piece. This can lead to degradation which means you need to have an underst…
    Hot Articles
•  Introduction to Art Restoration
•  Introduction to Art Conservation
•  Da Vinci - The Art of Illusion
•  How to Learn Close-Up Magic-Creat
•  Vincent Van Gogh - Great Painter
•  A Classic Old Time Radio Show to
•  Learning Close Up Magic - Dealing
•  Walk Around Magic - Steps to Prep
•  Searching For A Soul Mate
•  Excavated Bronzes - Tips How To R
•  Sutherland Dragonfly-Moy Sutherla
•  Introduction to Bollywood
    Rec. Articles
•  The Secret Artists For Centuries
•  Weeding Out Defectives
•  Suduko - How To Double Your Speed
•  Card Magic Tricks - Tips For New
•  Monkeys And Bananas
   Home > Arts & Literature >
Introduction to Art Restoration

The nature of art is such that it tends to be fragile, particularly if it is an older piece. This can lead to degradation which means you need to have an understanding of art restoration.Art restoration is simply the work of attempting to restore a work of art to its original pristine form. It is an attempt to recapture how the art looked when it was actually finished and before the ravages of time or even of deliberate damage caused to deteriorate. One of the problems that art conservationist have with art restoration is that the work is really being restored to how it is imagined it really looked in its original form. Since this always involves a certain amount of guess work, the integrity of the original and its historic value may be lostIn the past, art restoration was the most common approach taken to ancient and historic works of art, but in recent years, the art conservationist have begun to have an impact on the field of art restoration as well. More care is given to use techniques that do really destroy the basic historic value of pieces by altering them to the point of irreversibility. This concept of reversibility has become a major guide to the work of the art restorer who respects the historical value of a piece as well as it aesthetic value.Of course, not all art is of great historic value. There is still a great need for art restoration in the area of cleaning of paintings that may have no great monetary value or historic value. The art restorer uses careful cleaning methods including solvents to break up such things as varnish residue and dust or grime caught in the impasto or paint layer of the work.There are certain areas of art restoration that take over when art conservation has failed and an attempt to restore the art to some kind of viewable condition is the only choice left. In these cases, the alternative to restoration is to lose the work forever. A good example of this type of art restoration is classical film. Many original movies have been lost forever because of the deterioration of the film. With the use of taping and other devices, this is not so much a threat to modern film, but thousands of classic films produced in the early years of film making would be lost forever with restoration.The debate between Art Conservation and Art Restoration is likely to continue. There is the fact that the true purpose of art is to be enjoyed. When the idea of conservation is to lock something away from view in order to save it for the future, there is certainly some feeling that we are going a bit astray in our thinking. While this may be the right choice for certain extremely rare and valuable pieces, the majority of art can be kept cleaned; have obvious damage repaired, and be touched up to look like new. Then, as art should be, it can be enjoyed in the present.

Pre:Da Vinci - The Art of Illusion   Next:nothing
Copyright©2008 MyWeb, All Rights Reserved.